NON VERBAL COMMUNICATION PDF

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PDF | Everything you need to know about NVC- Instructors- more A model of nonverbal communication Source: Adapted from Eunson (). Nonverbal Communication. NVC can be communicated through gestures and touch (Haptic communication), by body language or posture, by. Non-verbal communication plays an important role in our daily life. body language and other aspects of non-verbal communication, we will be able to.


Non Verbal Communication Pdf

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This is “Nonverbal Communication”, chapter 4 from the book A Primer on on nonverbal communication for thousands of years before we developed the. According to experts, a substantial portion of our communication is nonverbal. Every day, we respond to thousands on nonverbal cues and. kinds of nonverbal messages: kinesics, paralanguage, proxemics, haptics, artifactual communication and appearance, olfactics, color, and chronemics. 3.

Nonverbal Communication: Definition, Types, Importance (Explained)

And unlike some forms of nonverbal communication, facial expressions are universal. The facial expressions for happiness, sadness, anger, surprise, fear, and disgust are the same across cultures. Body movement and posture. Consider how your perceptions of people are affected by the way they sit, walk, stand, or hold their head.

The way you move and carry yourself communicates a wealth of information to the world. This type of nonverbal communication includes your posture, bearing, stance, and the subtle movements you make.

Gestures are woven into the fabric of our daily lives. You may wave, point, beckon, or use your hands when arguing or speaking animatedly, often expressing yourself with gestures without thinking. However, the meaning of some gestures can be very different across cultures. Eye contact. Since the visual sense is dominant for most people, eye contact is an especially important type of nonverbal communication.

The way you look at someone can communicate many things, including interest, affection, hostility, or attraction. We communicate a great deal through touch.

Think about the very different messages given by a weak handshake, a warm bear hug, a patronizing pat on the head, or a controlling grip on the arm, for example. Have you ever felt uncomfortable during a conversation because the other person was standing too close and invading your space? We all have a need for physical space, although that need differs depending on the culture, the situation, and the closeness of the relationship. You can use physical space to communicate many different nonverbal messages, including signals of intimacy and affection, aggression or dominance.

Can nonverbal communication be faked? There are many books and websites that offer advice on how to use body language to your advantage.

For example, they may instruct you on how to sit a certain way, steeple your fingers, or shake hands in order to appear confident or assert dominance. And the harder you try, the more unnatural your signals are likely to come across. How nonverbal communication can go wrong What you communicate through your body language and nonverbal signals affects how others see you, how well they like and respect you, and whether or not they trust you.

Unfortunately, many people send confusing or negative nonverbal signals without even knowing it. And if he takes your hand, he lunges to get it and then squeezes so hard it hurts. Jack is a caring guy who secretly wishes he had more friends, but his nonverbal awkwardness keeps people at a distance and limits his ability to advance at work. Arlene is attractive and has no problem meeting eligible men, but she has a difficult time maintaining a relationship for longer than a few months.

Arlene is funny and interesting, but even though she constantly laughs and smiles, she radiates tension. Her shoulders and eyebrows are noticeably raised, her voice is shrill, and her body is stiff. Being around Arlene makes many people feel anxious and uncomfortable. Arlene has a lot going for her that is undercut by the discomfort she evokes in others. When Sharon had something to say, Ted was always ready with wild eyes and a rebuttal before she could finish her thought.

This made Sharon feel ignored, and soon she started dating other men.

Ted loses out at work for the same reason. His inability to listen to others makes him unpopular with many of the people he most admires. These smart, well-intentioned people struggle in their attempt to connect with others. The sad thing is that they are unaware of the nonverbal messages they communicate. How to improve nonverbal communication Nonverbal communication is a rapidly flowing back-and-forth process that requires your full focus on the moment-to-moment experience.

As well as being fully present, you can improve how you communicate nonverbally by learning to manage stress and developing your emotional awareness. Learn to manage stress in the moment Stress compromises your ability to communicate. And remember: emotions are contagious.

If you are upset, it is very likely to make others upset, thus making a bad situation worse. Take a moment to calm down before you jump back into the conversation. The fastest and surest way to calm yourself and manage stress in the moment is to employ your senses—what you see, hear, smell, taste, and touch—or through a soothing movement.

Posture and movement can also convey a great deal of information. Research on body language has grown significantly since the 's, but popular media have focused on the over-interpretation of defensive postures, arm-crossing, and leg-crossing, especially after publishing Julius Fast's book Body Language.

While these nonverbal behaviors can indicate feelings and attitudes , research suggests that body language is far more subtle and less definitive than previously believed. People often refer to their need for "personal space," which is also an important type of nonverbal communication.

The amount of distance we need and the amount of space we perceive as belonging to us is influenced by a number of factors including social norms, cultural expectations, situational factors, personality characteristics, and level of familiarity. For example, the amount of personal space needed when having a casual conversation with another person usually varies between 18 inches to four feet. On the other hand, the personal distance needed when speaking to a crowd of people is around 10 to 12 feet.

The eyes play an important role in nonverbal communication and such things as looking, staring and blinking are important nonverbal behaviors.

When people encounter people or things that they like, the rate of blinking increases and pupils dilate. Looking at another person can indicate a range of emotions including hostility, interest, and attraction.

People also utilize eye gaze as a means to determine if someone is being honest. Normal, steady eye contact is often taken as a sign that a person is telling the truth and is trustworthy. Shifty eyes and an inability to maintain eye contact, on the other hand, is frequently seen as an indicator that someone is lying or being deceptive. Communicating through touch is another important nonverbal behavior.

There has been a substantial amount of research on the importance of touch in infancy and early childhood. Harry Harlow's classic monkey study demonstrated how deprived touch and contact impedes development.

Baby monkeys raised by wire mothers experienced permanent deficits in behavior and social interaction. Touch can be used to communicate affection, familiarity, sympathy, and other emotions.

Nonverbal Communication

In her book Interpersonal Communication: Everyday Encounters , author Julia Wood writes that touch is also often used as a way to communicate both status and power.

Researchers have found that high-status individuals tend to invade other people's personal space with greater frequency and intensity than lower-status individuals.

Sex differences also play a role in how people utilize touch to communicate meaning.

Women tend to use touch to convey care, concern, and nurturance. Men, on the other hand, are more likely to use touch to assert power or control over others.

Our choice of color, clothing, hairstyles, and other factors affecting appearance are also considered a means of nonverbal communication. Research on color psychology has demonstrated that different colors can evoke different moods. Appearance can also alter physiological reactions, judgments, and interpretations. Just think of all the subtle judgments you quickly make about someone based on his or her appearance.

These first impressions are important, which is why experts suggest that job seekers dress appropriately for interviews with potential employers. Researchers have found that appearance can play a role in how people are perceived and even how much they earn.

One study found that attorneys who were rated as more attractive than their peers earned nearly 15 percent more than those ranked as less attractive. Culture is an important influence on how appearances are judged. While thinness tends to be valued in Western cultures, some African cultures relate full-figured bodies to better health, wealth, and social status.

Objects and images are also tools that can be used to communicate nonverbally. On an online forum, for example, you might select an avatar to represent your identity online and to communicate information about who you are and the things you like. People often spend a great deal of time developing a particular image and surrounding themselves with objects designed to convey information about the things that are important to them. Uniforms, for example, can be used to transmit a tremendous amount of information about a person.

A soldier will don fatigues, a police offers will wear a uniform, and a doctor will wear a white lab coat. At a mere glance, these outfits tell people what a person does for a living. Nonverbal communication plays an important role in how we convey meaning and information to others, as well as how we interpret the actions of those around us. The important thing to remember when looking at such nonverbal behaviors is to consider the actions in groups.

What a person actually says along with his or her expressions, appearance, and tone of voice might tell you a great deal about what that person is really trying to say. Have you ever wondered what your personality type means? Sign up to get these answers, and more, delivered straight to your inbox. There was an error.

Facial Expressions

Please try again. Thank you, , for signing up.In a classroom, silence indicates that students are listening carefully and attentively. While the world encourages us to "be ourselves," there is a time and a place for nonverbal cues.

By touching, one can express a wide range of emotions.

Examples of Nonverbal Communication

Quick Expression of Message Non-verbal cues like sign and symbol can also communicate some messages very quickly than written or oral media. Facial Expressions Facial expressions are responsible for a huge proportion of nonverbal communication.

There are many books and websites that offer advice on how to use body language to your advantage. But, we probably won't always be right.

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